Column: Help struggling parents say ‘yes’ to their kids

Michael Morrisey is the executive director of the Catholic Education Foundation. You can reach him at (913) 647-0383 or send an email to him at: mmorrisey@archkck.org.
Michael Morrisey is the executive director of the Catholic Education Foundation. You can reach him at (913) 647-0383 or send an email to him at: mmorrisey@archkck.org.

by Michael Morrisey

What are you going to be when you grow up? The answer to that question is not an easy one and, as a child, can be somewhat daunting.

At some point in each of our lives, we have asked at least one question regarding our future. I said “one,” being kind. In most of our lives, we have dealt with many futuristic questions. You know what I am talking about!

As a child: When are we going to eat? What time do I have to go to bed? Why do I have to clean my room before I go outside and play?

As a teenager: I know we just ate, but when are we going to eat again? Curfew is at what time? I am tired of bumming rides from my friends, when can I get a car of my own?

As a young adult: I know we just ate, but when are we going to eat again? I need to get a job this summer? How am I ever going to be able to pay back my student loans?

As an adult: If I take the job transfer, who will be my new boss? What are the Catholic school options at this new locale? If we buy this house, what are the parish boundaries?

I could go on, but you get the gist! These are real-life questions and the direction indicates that we take many things for granted, including our Catholic education.

How about this question: Dad/ Mom, why can’t I go to a Catholic school? Answer: Because we don’t have the money to send you to a Catholic school. Tough question and a tougher answer!

U.S. Census Bureau reports tell us that the percentage of Americans living in poverty rose last year to 13.2, the highest level in 11 years. In our world today, that translates to about 39.8 million people in households with an annual income below the federal definition of poverty, which is $22,025 for a family of four. Unreal!

You, I and others have the opportunity to help with the “tough question and answer” in our own archdiocese by helping to provide scholarships for children in need through the Catholic Education Foundation. We just need to be futuristic thinkers and do it! A Catholic school education can be the springboard to higher education, the best way to break the cycle of poverty.

Our children’s future is our future. I encourage each of you to think ahead and help a child in need!

Ralph Waldo Emerson said it best: “It is one of the most beautiful compensations of life, that no man can sincerely help another without helping himself.”

For more information, please visit our Web site at: www.cefks.org.

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