Column: Appreciate your ‘wonderful life’? Help kids enjoy the same

Michael Morrisey is the executive director of the Catholic Education Foundation. You can reach him at (913) 647-0383 or send an email to him at: mmorrisey@archkck.org.
Michael Morrisey is the executive director of the Catholic Education Foundation. You can reach him at (913) 647-0383 or send an email to him at: mmorrisey@archkck.org.

by Michael Morrissey

How many of you have seen the Christmas movie “It’s a Wonderful Life”?

Seriously, I can’t believe that some of you have not seen it. Where have you been? You really need to get out more.

OK, for those of you who have not seen it, the condensed version is as follows: The location is tiny Bedford Falls, it is a snowy Christmas, the hero’s family owns a building and loan business, he has a loving wife and four darling children, the bad guy owns the rest of the town and Clarence is an angel second class with vintage, trying hard to get his wings. He is sent down from above to help George, who is our hero and is in a pickle, contemplating suicide.

There is no need to say it; I am feeling your vibes. You are thinking, “We can’t stop now for popcorn; keep telling the story.” All right, already!

If I asked those of you who have seen the movie, “What is the moral of the story?” you would probably tell me the moral is that life can never be that bad. Or, wake up and smell the roses; there is a silver lining in every cloud; the best things in life are free, etc. All of those are certainly true. However, I believe there is also a CEF spin to this movie. The movie could be titled “It’s a Wonderful CEF Life.”

To help you better understand my thinking, the following are key excerpts from this flick: “He has the faith of a child.” “I want to do something big and important — we are doing something big and important.” “I want you to lasso the moon.” “Each man’s life touches so many other lives.” “Helping others makes him the richest man in town.”

Conceptually, each of you is recreating “It’s a Wonderful Life” each day you assist our CEF students by providing scholarships for children in need. They need your help! You are the angel Clarence in their life. (I am sure with less vintage).

So, as our credits start to roll, George and Clarence close with: “Dear Father in heaven, show me the way, no one is born to be a failure, no one is poor who has friends.” And the child ZuZu speaks: “Teacher says every time a bell rings, an angel gets its wings.” That could be you! Get a jump on getting your wings by helping a CEF kid.

Consider giving the Christmas gift of Catholic education — your holiday present to the future!

For more information on how to help provide scholarships for children in need, go to our website at: www. cefks.org.

Leave a Reply